League attends rally in North Carolina

League attends rally in North Carolina

League members joined many other protesters in North Carolina and rallied at a monument to Confederate soldiers. The following is their account of the event:

Last Saturday July 18th approximately 1500 people gathered at the Alamance County Historical Courthouse in Graham, North Carolina to show their support for a Confederate soldier monument in response to a call by a group calling itself “Concerned Citizens for Alamance County” to have it removed. Although the rally was scheduled to run from noon to 2:00, people were arriving as early as 7:30 and by 10:30 the square around the courthouse was already full of several hundred people. Speakers discussed the significance of the monument, Civil War history, the legality and validity of secession, and the general state of the country. Among the attendees were the Sons of Confederate Veterans, Civil War re-enactors, bikers, and families with small children, as well as several members of The League of the South. One of them brought about a hundred copies of The Free Magnolia, which were distributed in a matter of minutes. No one refused a copy and a few people even requested more than one. The rally was orderly and a general air of pleasantness and camaraderie prevailed, with the only drawback being a few intermittent downpours that began shortly after noon. Approximately fifty law enforcement officers from various agencies were on hand ready to handle any incidents that might arise, although the rumoured opposition presence never materialised. Graham Police Captain Steve McGilvrey expressed his satisfaction with the event, saying that the protesters should be proud of themselves and adding, “I’m pleased with all aspects of this event. I could not have asked for a better day.” The rally appeared to have its desired effect, as the following Monday evening the Alamance County Commissioners voted unanimously not to remove the Confederate statue.

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